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 If Happy Hour leaves you cold... 
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Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2016 6:08 pm
Posts: 1600
Location: Tuggeranong, just north of Cooma
Post If Happy Hour leaves you cold...
Happy Hour can be exceptional with much chat and debate. Then it has the propensity to turn sour when someone gets too happy and becomes a problem; why not invite a few fellow travellers around for "Tea"?
Its so much more refined and the bogans tend not to accept the invitation.

The traditional time for afternoon tea is four o'clock

Along with a choice of teas, loose leaf NOT tea bags, there are three distinct courses:

1. Cucumber sandwiches first, White bread, paper thin slices of cucumber and crusts cut off either cut into "soldiers" or triangles.

2. then scones with berry jam and whipped (not aerosol) cream, and finally,

3. Pastries.

INVITATIONS

Should be extended well before to allow your guests time to prepare

Invite a close friend or two also as "pourers" and set up a schedule of when each will be "on duty" dispensing tea. No one should pour for more than fifteen or twenty minutes. It is an honour to be asked to pour tea. The pourer is considered the guardian of the teapot, which implies sterling social graces and profound trust.

TEA EQUIPMENT

If it is not a large formal tea, a silver tray and tea service are not necessary.

A china tea set consists of:

1. a teapot,

2. a creamer for the milk,

3. a sugar bowl,

4. a Jug of hot water (for those who prefer weak tea), and

5. A plate for lemon slices arranged on a wooden or tin tray is fine.

The tea tray and china tea set are placed at one end of the table.

On the right, set out the necessary number of cups and saucers and teaspoons.

Plates, flatware, and tea napkins are placed on the left.

Platters of refreshments can include tea sandwiches in fancy shapes, various kinds of nut breads, cakes, pastries, and cookies.

FLATWARE

Flatware is necessary at teas in the following situations:

• When serving cake that is very soft and sticky or filled with cream, forks must be laid on the tea table.

• If jam or cream is to be eaten on scones or bread, there must be knives or butter spreaders.

• If there are dishes with jam and cream where everyone takes a portion, each dish should have its own serving spoon. Never use your own utensils to dip into the jam or cream dish.

When seated at a table there should be at each place setting:

• a knife or butter spreader on the right side of the plate and

• A fork on the left side.

• A teaspoon may be placed on the saucer holding the cup or to the right of the knife.

TEACUPS

HOW TO HOLD CUPS AND SAUCERS

Place the saucer holding the cup in the palm of your left hand and move it forward to rest on the four fingers, which are slightly spread apart.

Steady the saucer with your thumb resting on the rim. A left-handed person simply reverses the procedure.

A handled cup is held with the index finger through the handle, the thumb just above it to support the grip, and the second finger below the handle for added security.

The next two fingers naturally follow the curve of the other fingers. It is an affectation to raise the little finger, even slightly.

FAUX PAS

• cradling the cup in one's fingers when it has a handle.

• Swirling the liquid around in the cup as if it were wine in a glass.



STIRRING A CUP OF TEA

Stirring a cup of tea is done gently and noiselessly by moving the teaspoon in a small arch back and forth in the centre of the cup.

• Do not allow the teaspoon to touch the sides or rim of the cup.

• Remove the spoon and place it on the saucer behind the cup, with the handle of the spoon pointing in the same direction as the handle of the cup.

• Visualize the face of a clock on the saucer and properly place the handle of the cup and the handle of the spoon at four on the clock.

FAUX PAS

• Leaving a spoon upright in the cup.

• Placing the spoon on the saucer in front of the cup.

• Making unnecessary noise by touching the sides of the cup with the spoon.

• Letting the spoon drop, after stirring the tea, with a clank onto the saucer.

TEA SPILLS IN YOUR SAUCER

Tea spills may be remedied by requesting a clean saucer. In a very casual setting, it is acceptable to fold a paper napkin and slip it under the cup to soak up the liquid. Remove the unsightly soggy napkin from the saucer and place it on another dish if one is available.

You can prevent saucer spills by filling the teacup only three-quarters full.

NAPKINS

The napkin is picked up and unfolded on the lap, not above the table level. A large dinner napkin is folded in half with the fold facing the body, while a luncheon or tea napkin may be opened completely. In upscale restaurants, the wait staff may place the napkin on your lap.

If you need to leave the table temporarily, place your napkin on your chair, not on the table. Push your chair back under the table if the setting is appropriate.

The host or hostess picks up his or her napkin to signal the close of the tea. He or she makes certain all of the guests have finished before making this move.

At the end of the tea, the napkin is not refolded but picked up by the centre and placed loosely to the left of the plate.

FAUX PAS

• Placing a used napkin back on the table before the meal is over.

TEA INFUSER/FILTER, TEA STRAINER, MOTE SPOON, AND CADDY SPOON

Tea infusers / filters are used to contain the leaves and permit easy removal of the used tea leaves. Some teapots are fitted with infusion baskets, also called filters. Be sure to give the leaves inside room to expand in the water when using the stainless-steel wire-mesh infusers, called "tea balls." Use two tea balls in making a six-cup pot.

Tea filters work best because they allow a lot of water to circulate without releasing the leaves into the brew.

Tea strainers are designed to be held above or to rest on top of the cup to catch leaves that escape from the teapot when the tea is poured.

A mote spoon or mote skimmer is usually made of silver with holes in the bowl. It is used to transfer tea leaves from the caddy to the teapot and also to skim off any stray leaves, or "motes," that may have escaped into the cup. The sharp point on the end is used to unblock the teapot spout if it gets clogged with tea leaves.

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Tue Nov 08, 2016 8:08 pm
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Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 9:04 pm
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Location: Albion Park. NSW.
Post Re: If Happy Hour leaves you cold...
http://www.raffles.com/singapore/offers ... rnoon-tea/

We had High Tea here and i thought that was pretty classy, just about as good as what you're are suggesting :lol:

We had a cup of coffee and a lamington for our Aussie high tea today :lol:

Hans

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Tue Nov 08, 2016 9:19 pm
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Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 4:08 pm
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Location: Albany Creek Qld
Post Re: If Happy Hour leaves you cold...
TramcarTrev wrote:
Happy Hour can be exceptional with much chat and debate. Then it has the propensity to turn sour when someone gets too happy and becomes a problem; why not invite a few fellow travellers around for "Tea"?
Its so much more refined and the bogans tend not to accept the invitation.

The traditional time for afternoon tea is four o'clock

Along with a choice of teas, loose leaf NOT tea bags, there are three distinct courses:

1. Cucumber sandwiches first, White bread, paper thin slices of cucumber and crusts cut off either cut into "soldiers" or triangles.

2. then scones with berry jam and whipped (not aerosol) cream, and finally,

3. Pastries.

I've just realized that I'm a bogan. :lol:
glanyard






























INVITATIONS

Should be extended well before to allow your guests time to prepare

Invite a close friend or two also as "pourers" and set up a schedule of when each will be "on duty" dispensing tea. No one should pour for more than fifteen or twenty minutes. It is an honour to be asked to pour tea. The pourer is considered the guardian of the teapot, which implies sterling social graces and profound trust.

TEA EQUIPMENT

If it is not a large formal tea, a silver tray and tea service are not necessary.

A china tea set consists of:

1. a teapot,

2. a creamer for the milk,

3. a sugar bowl,

4. a Jug of hot water (for those who prefer weak tea), and

5. A plate for lemon slices arranged on a wooden or tin tray is fine.

The tea tray and china tea set are placed at one end of the table.

On the right, set out the necessary number of cups and saucers and teaspoons.

Plates, flatware, and tea napkins are placed on the left.

Platters of refreshments can include tea sandwiches in fancy shapes, various kinds of nut breads, cakes, pastries, and cookies.

FLATWARE

Flatware is necessary at teas in the following situations:

• When serving cake that is very soft and sticky or filled with cream, forks must be laid on the tea table.

• If jam or cream is to be eaten on scones or bread, there must be knives or butter spreaders.

• If there are dishes with jam and cream where everyone takes a portion, each dish should have its own serving spoon. Never use your own utensils to dip into the jam or cream dish.

When seated at a table there should be at each place setting:

• a knife or butter spreader on the right side of the plate and

• A fork on the left side.

• A teaspoon may be placed on the saucer holding the cup or to the right of the knife.

TEACUPS

HOW TO HOLD CUPS AND SAUCERS

Place the saucer holding the cup in the palm of your left hand and move it forward to rest on the four fingers, which are slightly spread apart.

Steady the saucer with your thumb resting on the rim. A left-handed person simply reverses the procedure.

A handled cup is held with the index finger through the handle, the thumb just above it to support the grip, and the second finger below the handle for added security.

The next two fingers naturally follow the curve of the other fingers. It is an affectation to raise the little finger, even slightly.

FAUX PAS

• cradling the cup in one's fingers when it has a handle.

• Swirling the liquid around in the cup as if it were wine in a glass.



STIRRING A CUP OF TEA

Stirring a cup of tea is done gently and noiselessly by moving the teaspoon in a small arch back and forth in the centre of the cup.

• Do not allow the teaspoon to touch the sides or rim of the cup.

• Remove the spoon and place it on the saucer behind the cup, with the handle of the spoon pointing in the same direction as the handle of the cup.

• Visualize the face of a clock on the saucer and properly place the handle of the cup and the handle of the spoon at four on the clock.

FAUX PAS

• Leaving a spoon upright in the cup.

• Placing the spoon on the saucer in front of the cup.

• Making unnecessary noise by touching the sides of the cup with the spoon.

• Letting the spoon drop, after stirring the tea, with a clank onto the saucer.

TEA SPILLS IN YOUR SAUCER

Tea spills may be remedied by requesting a clean saucer. In a very casual setting, it is acceptable to fold a paper napkin and slip it under the cup to soak up the liquid. Remove the unsightly soggy napkin from the saucer and place it on another dish if one is available.

You can prevent saucer spills by filling the teacup only three-quarters full.

NAPKINS

The napkin is picked up and unfolded on the lap, not above the table level. A large dinner napkin is folded in half with the fold facing the body, while a luncheon or tea napkin may be opened completely. In upscale restaurants, the wait staff may place the napkin on your lap.

If you need to leave the table temporarily, place your napkin on your chair, not on the table. Push your chair back under the table if the setting is appropriate.

The host or hostess picks up his or her napkin to signal the close of the tea. He or she makes certain all of the guests have finished before making this move.

At the end of the tea, the napkin is not refolded but picked up by the centre and placed loosely to the left of the plate.

FAUX PAS

• Placing a used napkin back on the table before the meal is over.

TEA INFUSER/FILTER, TEA STRAINER, MOTE SPOON, AND CADDY SPOON

Tea infusers / filters are used to contain the leaves and permit easy removal of the used tea leaves. Some teapots are fitted with infusion baskets, also called filters. Be sure to give the leaves inside room to expand in the water when using the stainless-steel wire-mesh infusers, called "tea balls." Use two tea balls in making a six-cup pot.

Tea filters work best because they allow a lot of water to circulate without releasing the leaves into the brew.

Tea strainers are designed to be held above or to rest on top of the cup to catch leaves that escape from the teapot when the tea is poured.

A mote spoon or mote skimmer is usually made of silver with holes in the bowl. It is used to transfer tea leaves from the caddy to the teapot and also to skim off any stray leaves, or "motes," that may have escaped into the cup. The sharp point on the end is used to unblock the teapot spout if it gets clogged with tea leaves.

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Wed Nov 09, 2016 7:54 am
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Joined: Tue Mar 24, 2009 3:08 pm
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Location: LONDONDERRY NSW
Post Re: If Happy Hour leaves you cold...
A bag of chips and a couple of beers sounds a lot more simple to me.





Hank

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Wed Nov 09, 2016 8:06 am
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Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2013 7:16 pm
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Location: Brisbane-Southside Qld
Post Re: If Happy Hour leaves you cold...
Yep I'm bogan to , always bang the spoon on the cup when stirring and don't know where to leave the spoon! Love slurping to.
The pastries and a mug of hot tea sound pretty good though :neutral:

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Sat Nov 12, 2016 6:56 am
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Post Re: If Happy Hour leaves you cold...
No good for me, I don't drink tea

Coffee √
Red wine. √
Scotch √
Port √
Bayley's √
But not tea

Yes I'm Bogan too, give me happy hour anytime
Many have become very happy but never had anyone go "too happy" and become a problem though

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Sat Nov 12, 2016 7:22 am
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Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2015 12:34 pm
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Location: Brisbane Bayside
Post Re: If Happy Hour leaves you cold...
Enjoy happy hour...but restrict myself to a couple of beers or a rum & coke.
Anything more and our camping neighbours will probably not be happy with a loud snoring beast next to them :(

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Sat Nov 12, 2016 12:03 pm
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Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2016 6:08 pm
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Location: Tuggeranong, just north of Cooma
Post Re: If Happy Hour leaves you cold...
And here am I thinking Im among a bunch well educated, inteligent members of society and I find myself swamped by bogans....

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Sun Nov 13, 2016 3:44 pm
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Post Re: If Happy Hour leaves you cold...
Welcome TT :lol:

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